Multimedia Postcards

Christoph Pohl loves to see new places, meet new people, and ‘have coffee & cigarettes here or chai & beedis there’. He calls himself a “multimedia traveller” who wants to create “good media” (guteMedien). In May 2008, when he started his overland journey from Istanbul to Auroville, South India, he travelled through Iran and Pakistan, filming, editing and uploading “multimedia postcards” on his minimal video blog called guteMedien postcast. After arriving in Auroville, the site is now the main window where he uploads all his audio-visual productions. We are publishing a few chapters* (with his notes) from his journeys here. In the first two videos, you will meet Christoph, drink coffee with him, smoke if you do, follow lady bugs, make few travel buddies, try to go to Darjeeling like in the limited movie, get held at Kolkata because of the riots in Darjeeling, and these are the beginnings of a trip to watch the eclipse in Varanasi.

The next four videos are some excellent snippets of life we really want you to watch and share. Here, you’ll meet Mrs. Parisa from Iran who doesn’t want to be called a terrorist, a Pakistani optician who travelled around Germany in 1985 and loves cars, a guesthouse owner in Mastuj who treats leprosy, and his young son Fahad’s stories of mountains and bomb blasts.

Click to watch all postcasts.  

I’m Waiting for the Men. 02 mins 45 s. 2009

Calcutta Dilemma. 04 mins. 2009. 

postcaster – I met Parisa in an internet café in Kerman. Just like most of the few English speaking Iranian people, she likes to get in touch with foreigners and practice her English. And just like every Iranian I met, she is incredibly hospitable, spending a full day with me, covering all our expenses and giving me no chance to invite her, not even for a chai. During a walk in the streets of Kerman we talked about some of her views on Iran. Mrs. Parisa about Iran… 03 mins 51 s. 2008

postcaster – My last afternoon in Lahore one guy came up to me asking if I need an optician. Well, yes, in fact I was looking for one, where I can get sunglasses with special spectacle glasses for my shortsightedness. So he took me to his father’s shop and I got this extra cool glasses for real cheap and within 3 hours! In the shop I met Dr. Muhammad Anwar, the owner and father of the guy who got me there. When I answered the obligatory question about my homeland, he said “Oh, Germany, have a look, I show you some photos.” And he did. And I loved them. I said “I’ll be back in 5 minutes” and I was, with my camera, ready to record what Dr. Muhammad Anwar had to tell… about his trip in 1985. 05 mins 02 s. 2008

postcaster – Mr. Jafar Nabi, the owner of the wonderful guesthouse ‘Tourist Garden’ in Mastuj, turned out to have a second life … Dr. Nabi and Mr. Jafar… 04 mins 38 s. 2008.

postcaster – Full service at the wonderful guesthouse ‘Tourist Garden’ in Mastuj included a little mountain tour with Jafar’s cute and smart son Fahad and his friend Nahim. With Fahad on Mountains and Bombblasts… 03 mins 47 s. 2008.

Read more about Christoph and his projects at Visual Berlin [http://visualberlin.org/artist/postcaster/] and visit guteMedien.de

*Some times WordPress does not accept Blip.tv embeds. It already took our muddled brains long to realize it could be so simple. So, do please go through the links to watch these videos, in case they don’t play here. Don’t miss them.

This post was put together by Chai Kadai. Feel free to share, copy, distribute and screen, under this Creative Commons license. Please attribute the videos to Christoph Pohl. 

Chai Kadai. (chaikadai.wordpress.com | chaikadai@gmail.com)

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

Experience of a Third World Person

In 2003, in Istanbul, Doris Salcedo made an installation on an unremarkable street comprising 1,600 wooden chairs stacked precariously in the space between two buildings. This work functions as political and mental archaeology, using domestic materials charged with significance and suffused with meanings accumulated over years of use in everyday life. More than just a pile of chairs this work is more like sculptures that take on the resonance of something lost, broken or mended.  Salcedo uses both gallery spaces and outside locations to create vertiginous environments charged with politics and history.  . Be it the antique invention – a chair that everyone uses everyday or a crack on the floor (see the image below), the work makes one take a second look at what one has neglected for long. This work below, entitled Shibboleth 2007, runs the full 167 metres of the cavernous hall on London’s South Bank. It begins as a crack then widens and deepens as it snakes across the room symbolising racial hatred and division in society. Salcedo claims the work took her over a year to make, and apparently spent the past five weeks installing it in the Tate. But she refused to reveal how it was achieved! It has taken five weeks of work here with very considerable disruption to the hall. It’s not an illusion – it’s there, it’s real.

Source: http://whitecube.com/artists/doris_salcedo/http://www.tate.org.uk/servlet/ArtistWorks?cgroupid=999999961&artistid=2695&tabview=bio