Celebrating Resistance: An Exhibition to Remember Three Decades of Struggle in Bhopal

Yes, Warren Anderson lived a full life of 92 years, escaping every law suit or call or cry possible. He probably had a wonderful memorial service organized by friends, family and colleagues. He will probably go down in corporate text books as the most resilient force against human rights movements as The Escapist, The Illusionist…

We can’t forget him. But, why does any struggle that questions economic growth, foreign investment, environmental degradation, or human right violations need to be part of our memory? Can’t we forget it as just another disaster? The thing is, these issues are not just happening in Bhopal, Cuddalore, Idinthakarai, or any one place. It is not a localized thing…

So The Remember Bhopal Trust inspired by the three decades of struggle by the Bhopal survivors, want to travel around the country, collect stories from similar struggles and weave it all in to a permanent museum in Bhopal.

As a start, from this Sunday, 9th of November 2014 to next Saturday the 15th of November 2014, in Chennai, the Trust has organized an exhibition of the lived memories of the disaster and the struggle that has followed.

Check out the event on Facebook. Join, invite, and go. Read and learn about the struggle at Bhopal.net

Can we crowdsource our memories of the city?

Fellowship Opportunity – The Urban History Project

“Neighbourhoods constantly change, and this change is a result of many forces that interact, and often resist each other to create the city that we see today…We hope that through granular narratives of people’s experience of place-making in Chennai, we gain insight into how we can build a more inclusive, and supportive city.”

Let’s start with Chennai…

The Old Mount Road. Source: The Hindu

The families and students of 1965 remember the Buhari’s at Mount Road, not the expensive chain of restaurants today, dipping chicken in chilli powder and frying it in deep boiling oil to create Chicken 65. What is the use of such a memory other than inducing an association or feeling in an individual(s)? Just a year before this Bob Dylan sang on American television sets  The Times They Are a-Changing

The million plans of restoration/beautification try to make Chennai a mega/metro/singara/swachch/industrial/growing city that arrogantly ignores the lives here. You and I are meant to move with the times that are a-changing. You or I might not own a strip of land here or have the status of power to make direct changes, but we do have our memories and our lives. We are introducing you to a new group of people who want to gather these memories and aspirations of our lives in this place and channel it for constructing Supportive Cities.

This fellowship opportunity is for any writer/filmmaker/photographer/historian or anyone who does not mind being unpaid in Chennai, while they set out on a six month journey to collect, collate and curate such memories. They promise bi-weekly training and a hand-held process that will end with a public exhibition at Dakshina Chitra. We think any student looking for internships or some experience should jump at this opportunity.

Register here NOW

sam pc

Paper Flowers

“Clapping gives us strength.” – Latha

Tamil (with English subtitles) 24 mins 46 s

How can one move from treating the third gender as a spectacle and object of curiousity for the camera and instead attempt to capture fellow human beings’ lives, aspirations and dreams?

After the landmark Supreme Court ruling recognizing the third gender status of all transgenders in the country, Rajiv Krishnan (the cinematographer of Paper Flowers) uploaded this film on Youtube as a celebration and salute.

In 1998, Hijra Guru Meena and Deepa Krishnan, were invited to a trans-gender conference organised by a theatre group in Austria. Unfortunately, Meena couldn’t get her passport. And so friends got together, and made a film to represent her in the conference. The result is an intimate and yet quick window in to family of individuals on a journey for their rightful dignity and respect.

Please watch, screen or share.

Our Family

“People should realize who an Aravani is. People should know that we too have a life. They should learn to respect our feelings. Society should also accept us. If we’re accepted, everything is fine.”
– Seetha, a dancer

Tamil (with English subtitles), 55 mins 20 s

Maybe you remember Urvashi Butalia ask whether an organ, some hormones, a choice or an obligation makes one a mother. Let’s ask, what makes a family?

The School of Media and Cultural Studies in Tata Institute of Social Sciences Mumbai have their very own Youtube channel, where every week they release a film from their archives. Our Family (2007) directed by Anjali Monteiro and K P Jayashankar, weaves together the story of a family of three generations of trans-genders, Aasha, Seetha and Dhana, with excerpts of  Nirvanam, a one person performance, by Pritham K. Chakravarthy. Watch, share and subscribe to the SMCS channel.

Dis-connecting People

On 01 May 2014, International Workers’ Day, Nokia India Thozhilalar Sangam released ‘Dis-Connecting People,’ a film documenting the voices of workers, which has remained muted in the battle between the state and the corporation.

Dis-Connecting People (35 mins: 18 Secs)

dvd blurb

For more information contact: Nokia India Thozhilalar Sangam at nokianits@gmail.com/ President -Sarvanan Kumar

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The International Uranium Film Festival 2013

Uranium Film FestivalCurated by two Brazilian film makers, this widely travelled international film festival, explores the entire nuclear life cycle — from the mining of uranium to disposal of radioactive wastes. Choosing from more than 50 documentaries and animation films, the Chennai chapter brings to viewers 20 films over a two-day period. The festival is geared towards engendering a more informed debate on these issues. Read more about the films here.

ENTRY FREE

WHAT: Festival of international documentaries, short films and animation films covering uranium mining, nuclear research, weapons, and power plants and nuclear waste. Discussions led by feature filmmakers and prominent intellectuals.

WHEN: Film Fest on February 5-6, 2013. 9.30 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Workshop on documentary film-making led by Alphonse Roy and R. Revathi on 7 February (9.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m.)

WHERE: Asian College of Journalism 2nd Main Road, Taramani (Near Indira Nagar MRTS, Behind MS Swaminathan Research Foundation)

Organised by: Chennai Solidarity Group for Koodankulam Struggle & Poovulagin Nanbargal

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Radioactive Wolves

English. 52 mins 09s.

What happens to nature after a nuclear accident? And how does wildlife deal with the world it inherits after human inhabitants have fled? The historic nuclear accident at Chernobyl is now 25 years old. Filmmakers and scientists set out to document the lives of the packs of wolves and other wildlife thriving in the dead zone that still surrounds the remains of the reactor.

An evening on the sea

Poovulagin Nanbargal presents

An evening on the sea – screening of documentary films on Koodankulam struggle.

“Nothing strengthens authority so much as silence” – Leonardo Davinci.

The screening of documentary films is intended to shed some light on the struggles of the people from Koodankulam spread over a year.

We believe that by screening these documentaries, we could effectively re-construct the various phases of struggle, and also record the voices of the people involved in the struggle in the mainstream.

Join your voices, with theirs. For silence only strengthens authority.

When: December 10, 6.00 P.M

Where: VisCom Hall, Loyola College 

Speakers: Writer Joe De Cruz, director Seenu Ramasamy, Director Ram, director Ranjith,Writer Baskar Sakthi and writer Ajayan Bala.

Contact: 98410 31730

invitation

Anugundu – The Atom Bomb | Documentary

Anugundu – The Atom Bomb ( Tamil with English subtitles) – YouTube. 48 minutes.

A film by Manila Mohan, a journalist with a Malayalam literary magazine, who visits the protesters in Koodankulam. The documentary details many pitfalls in the building and commissioning of the nuclear power plant in Idinthakarai, Koodankulam. It interviews many of the villagers, including women and children, who express concerns about their safety, the stupidity of such an unsafe technology, and question for whom is this development and electricity that the States promise.

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Recent photographs from Idinthakarai, Koodankulam

Amirtharaj Stephen shares with us some of his photographs taken during the last few months covering events regarding the Anti-Koodankulam Nuclear Power Plant Protests.

Click on any thumbnail to view Gallery 

UPDATE FROM DIANUKE.ORG

With the Idinthakarai-based anti-Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP) protestors gearing-up for their ultimate agitation to ensure the permanent closure of the ready-to-be-commissioned nuclear power programme within a next few days, Collector R. Selvaraj has extended the prohibitory orders promulgated under Section 144 of the Criminal Procedure Code to seven km from the KKNPP site.

The announcement was made last night shortly after 10 p.m. that enabled the officials to implement the orders from the existing 2-km radius from KKNPP site to 7 km. It will be in force till 6 p.m. June 7. After the district administration received intelligence reports that a few thousands of protestors, mostly from coastal hamlets, might block the roads leading to the KKNPP site and lay siege to the nuclear power project site, the existing prohibitory orders was extended up to 7 km under which Idinthakarai, the protest hub, also falls.

Additional reinforcements are being rushed to Kudankulam and its surroundings. Armed Reserve Police, 100 personnel from Tamil Nadu Commando Force and 100 personnel from Tamil Nadu Special Task Force had been deployed till Wednesday evening.

KOODANKULAM SPEAKS – Bookmark this page to follow Dianuke.org’s live stream from Idinthakarai and find other links relating to anti nuclear protests in Koodankulam and other parts of the world.